Opportunity Fund loan consultant Osbaldo Velazquez was recently featured on KLAA Community Cares, an Anaheim-based radio program that addresses issues and organizations from the Southern California area that impact the community. KLAA Community Cares host Tammy Trujillo featured Osbaldo and one of the small business borrowers he’s helped with financing, David Anderson. David sells products at home shows, events, and convention centers.

Opportunity Fund loan consultant Osbaldo Velazquez was recently featured on KLAA Community Cares, an Anaheim-based radio program that addresses issues and organizations from the Southern California area that impact the community. KLAA Community Cares host Tammy Trujillo featured Osbaldo and one of the small business borrowers he’s helped with financing, David Anderson. David sells products at home shows, events, and convention centers.

Here are some highlights from the broadcast:

The importance of shopping local

David Anderson: Opportunity Fund can help because having a little bit of access to just some capital, to maybe make some new signs, you know? If I want to make some signs, they cost a few hundred dollars and on a given week I may not have that few hundred dollars to invest in some new signs.

If I can get some working capital, a small loan from somebody, like Opportunity Fund, then I’m more able to invest that extra hundred bucks this week, an extra two hundred bucks that week, in growing my marketing presence. I can reallocate my resources a little bit.

It gives you a little breathing room and a little flexibility to make different decisions that maybe you wouldn’t be able to make because otherwise you’re hand to mouth to a certain degree.

Tammy Trujillo: Where would we be without small businesses? They’re everywhere. I love going to family owned owned businesses because you get a lot of great attention from them. They have products you don’t find sometimes. I like it because I know when I buy [something], I’m helping them out.

David: I often say, if you want a strong economy, spend some dollars locally. I live in Huntington Beach and when I do our street fair there, the income I get goes back to the restaurants and the shops in town because that’s where I get my coffee on a Tuesday morning.

How to get started in small business

Tammy:  Is [now] a good time to start a small business?

Osbaldo Velazquez: I think it’s always a good time to start a business if it’s something that you like and that you want to do. I think you should pursue your dreams. This is the beauty about our country. There are a lot of resources here that support the growth of a small business. It’s easy to start a business, compared to some other countries. In Latin America, to start a business, formally and officially, it might take more than a month. Here, you can go to the county recorder, file a fictitious business name and start a business that way. Depending on the type of business you’re going to start, [you might need] a permit at the city where you’re going to operate, depending on the product or service that you’re going to sell. If you’re going to purchase products for resale, then you’re going to want to get a reseller’s permit with the state.

Those permits are relatively easy to get. The processes are simple. Again, it comes back to the fact that our country supports entrepreneurship because of the economic impact it has in all of us, in all of our local communities and the city and the state and the country.

It’s what makes this country great, to be able to sell and create. It is always a good time to start. There are seasons during the year or during different economic cycles that it might become harder, [like] after the recession. In some instances, it’s even a necessity. Here in southern California, where we have a lot of immigration, especially from Mexico and Latin America, there are a lot of immigrants that come here and start a business because out of need. They might not know the language but they know they have some skill to start a small food business, [for example]. [Many] businesses that have been started by immigrants become big businesses [and even] become corporations.

What to look for in a lender

Osbaldo: The important thing is to go to the resources that support small businesses and avoid other “opportunities” that can provide quick money without a lot of process and paperwork. In the small print or no print at all, [they find out that they signed up for] high cost loans.

You must navigate the waters carefully. Follow your passion and access [community] resources like Opportunity Fund. Do your comparison between the different types of products [for] capital. Compare the lending costs and make an informed decision so that you can have the best resources available to support the growth of your business.

Listen to the full broadcast on our SoundCloud channel here.


Opportunity Fund is California’s largest and fastest-growing nonprofit lender to small businesses. Last year, we made $60M in loans to help more than 2,200 small business owners invest in their businesses.  Opportunity Fund invests in small business owners who do not have access to traditional financing. As a founding member and signatory to the Borrower’s Bill of Rights, we believe in the important role small businesses play in our community and the economy, and we aim to help owners financially succeed.

Visit us online at opportunityfundloan.org and follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Opportunity Fund. Working Capital for Working People. opportunityfund.org